Phenomenology vs. Grounded Theory: The Appropriate Approach to Use to Study the Perspectives
of Instructional Librarians on Their Roles in Information Literacy Education for Undergraduates.


Table of Contents

Section I: Introduction

Section II: The Armchair Walkthroughs

A. Phenomenology

    1. The Purpose and Goals of a Phenomenological Approach to Research
    2. What is the Question?
    3. What is the Setting of a Phenomenologic Study?
    4. Who are the Participants?
    5. How Many Participants Are Required?
    6. How Are the Data Collected? What Are the Data Sources?
    7. How Are the Data Analyzed?
    8. What Kind of Results Can Be Expected?
    9. Assumptions
    10. Special Conditions and Challenges Presented by the Phenomenologic Approach
    11. When to use Phenomenology

B. Grounded Theory

    1. The Purpose and Goals of a Grounded Theory Approach to Research
    2. What is the Question?
    3. What is the Setting for a Study Using a Grounded Theory Approach?
    4. Who are the Participants?
    5. How Many Participants are Required?
    6. How Are the Data Collected? What Are the Data Sources?
    7. How Are the Data Analyzed?
    8. What Kind of Results Can Be Expected?
    9. Assumptions
    10. Special Conditions and Challenges Presented by the Grounded Theory Approach
    11. When to Use Grounded Theory

Section III: Methodological Cohesiveness and Rigour: A Comparison of Phenomenology to Grounded Theory for Investigation of Librariansí Perspectives on Their Roles in Information Literacy Education for Undergraduates

Section IV: References



This paper was originally written for Interdisciplinary Studies 560, Qualitative Methods. This course was offered by the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta and hosted by the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology. In April, 2004 this paper was revised and converted into an HTML document to fulfill the LIS 600, Capping Exercise requirement.

Judith E. Franchuk
April 2004