PubMed Tutorial

 

 

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Introduction to PubMed

The following content was created during my practicum placement at the Centre for Health Evidence, in the fall of 2002. It should be stressed that this website includes only the tutorial’s content and not the interactive tutorial itself. The final version of this tutorial will be run on the Centre for Health Evidence’s VIVIDESK survey tool, which is the sole property of CHE and thus not available for general distribution. In the hopes of making the present version more palatable I have included some hyperlinks and screen captures.

I am happy to be given the opportunity to showcase this project, because it melds several of my interests. These interests include: reference, instruction, web content, and evidence-based practice. While the first three are familiar to most librarians, evidence-based practice deserves some elaboration.  Evidence-based practice is usually associated with evidence-based medicine.   However, there is a growing movement to take an interdisciplinary outlook to this practice.  As the Special Libraries Association June 2001 Research Statement states:

Despite the limitations of the past, there is great potential for the growing field of library and information science to develop and sustain a vibrant research culture that will form the basis for evidence-based practice. The field has an opportunity to draw not only upon its own research base, but also to link to the relevant research findings in fields such as computer science, engineering, management, sociology and psychology. Achieving a culture of evidence-based practice will require the cooperation of practitioners, researchers and associations—all have key roles to play in this evolution.[1]

I believe this is a clarion call to academic librarians to embrace and elevate our research roots and form strong ties to the academic fields we serve.  The ability of our patrons to obtain information has never been simpler.  However, it is the responsibility of our profession to ensure our patrons have the most relevant information available.  By failing to do so we risk making our own profession teeter on irrelevance in the minds of our patrons.

 

 

1Putting OUR Knowledge to Work: A New SLA Research Statement.” Special Libraries Assocuation. 22 Oct. 2002. 13 Mar. 2003 <http://www.sla.org/content/memberservice/researchforum/rsrchstatement.cfm>.